Bird Families

Acrocephalus longirostris

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  • ISBN: 978-6-1310-2504-4
  • 92 pages
  • july 2011
  • Book on demand
  • 160 g

List of varieties in taxonomic order

  • A songbird with a mustache Acrocephalus melanopogon
  • Aquatic songbird, Acrocephalus paludicola
  • Warbler-badger, Acrocephalus schoenobaenus
  • The variegated songbird of the reed, Acrocephalus sorghophilus
  • Black-browed reed songbird, Acrocephalus bistrigiceps
  • Rice plantation songbird, Acrocephalus agricola
  • Manchu reed songbird, Acrocephalus tangorum (sometimes included in A. agricola)
  • Blunt-winged songbird Acrocephalus concinens
  • Eurasian reed songbird, Acrocephalus scirpaceus
  • African reed songbird, Acrocephalus baeticatus
  • Blythe's reed songbird, Acrocephalus dumetorum
  • Marsh warbler, Acrocephalus palustris
  • Great songbird of the reed, Acrocephalus arundinaceus
  • Eastern reed songbird, Acrocephalus orientalis
  • The persistent songbird of the reed, Acrocephalus stentoreus
  • Big-beaked reed songbird, Acrocephalus orinus
  • Songbird of Basra reed, Acrocephalus griseldis
  • Australian reed songbird, Acrocephalus australis
  • The nightingale reed songbird, Acrocephalus luscinius
  • Saipan reed songbird, Acrocephalus hiwae
  • Aguiguan reed warbler, Acrocephalus nijoi
  • The pagan songbird of the reed, Acrocephalus yamashinae
  • Songbird of the Mangarev reed, Acrocephalus astrolabii
  • Carolina reed songbird, Eustachian tube Acrocephalus
  • The reed songbird of Nauru, Acrocephalus rehsei
  • Millerbird, Acrocephalus familiaris
  • Bokikokiko, Acrocephalus aequinoctialis
  • Tahiti reed songbird, Acrocephalus caffer
  • Moorea reed songbird, Acrocephalus longirostris
  • Garrett's reed songbird, Acrocephalus Museum
  • Tuamotu reed songbird, Acrocephalus atyphus
  • Rimatara reed songbird, Acrocephalus rimatarae
  • Pitcairn reed songbird, Acrocephalus vaughani
  • Henderson's reed songbird, Acrocephalus taiti
  • Northern reed warbler, Marquesan, Acrocephalus percernis
  • Southern Marquesan reed songbird, Acrocephalus mendanae
  • Prepare the reed songbird, Acrocephalus kerearako
  • Great songbird of the swamp, Acrocephalus rufescens
  • Songbird of Cape Verde, Acrocephalus brevipennis
  • Small marsh songbird, Acrocephalus gracilirostris
  • Madagascar swamp songbird, Acrocephalus newtoni
  • Rodriguez's songbird, Acrocephalus rodericanus
  • Songbird of the Seychelles, Acrocephalus sechellensis

A fragmentary fossil remains from the Late Miocene (about 11 mya) Rudabánya (NE Hungary) show some apomorphies typical of this genus. Given its rather early age (most of the genera of Passerida are not known until the Pliocene), it is not too certain that it is correctly placed here, but it is very likely to belong to the Acrocephalidae at least.

# 1 Yaroslava

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    # 2 Sleepy

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    • My name is Nikolai
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    Does anyone have any experience of containing this miracle? Please share!

    It feeds exclusively on acropora polyps in huge quantities. Or we provide them to him. or he soon dies.

    I can’t immediately remember more than one bank where he would have lived for a long time.

    With respect, Nicholai.

    I do not answer the "aquarium" questions in PM. Write to the forum, please.

    # 3 Yaroslava

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    Sleepy, thanks for the answer!

    I also read that the main menu is acropora polyps. With such a mouth, only, of course, pinch polyps.
    But somewhere in my search ordeals it flashed that sometimes they can be transferred to other feeds, there are even rollers, where they actively catch in the water clearly not "carefully" tugged polyps of the acropores. And if someone managed to raise the cubs.

    # 4 Sleepy

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    • My name is Nikolai
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    I also read that the main menu is acropora polyps. With such a mouth, only, of course, pinch polyps.
    But somewhere in my search ordeals it flashed that sometimes they can be transferred to other feeds, there are even rollers, where they actively catch in the water clearly not "carefully" tugged polyps of the acropores. And if someone managed to raise the cubs.

    I can't remember they ate anything else. But it doesn't matter. It is possible that in one case out of 100,000 people were lucky.

    About the cubs. uh. By and large, only a few species of marine tropical fish are currently bred. With simple ones, everything is relatively easy, but up to complex so far it is heavenly. IncludingWe are unlikely to see a bred oxymanocanthus fry in the next 10-20 years.

    With respect, Nicholai.

    I do not answer the "aquarium" questions in PM. Write to the forum, please.

    # 5 Mikhail D.

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    To keep this fish, you need a forest of acroporas and a volume of several tons, it would be better if it was generally forbidden to catch these fish, like beautiful nudibranchs.

    In general, they feed it like this, they take the branches of the acropora, freeze it and wrap the food with a thread, and gradually throw it in, but it is worth staying only in the quarantine jar, in the display it is unrealistic to attract his attention with this.

    • Sleepy and sikoko12 like this

    # 6 Polina Rodionova

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    • Konstantin likes it

    # 7 Polina Rodionova

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    • Konstantin likes it

    # 8 Sleepy

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    Phew you! What is this, bred in captivity?

    With respect, Nicholai.

    I do not answer the "aquarium" questions in PM. Write to the forum, please.

    # 9 Mikhail D.

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    # 10 Polina Rodionova

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    Phew you! What is this, bred in captivity?

    Yes, in one of the above videos, they are divorced in captivity.

    • Teri like this

    # 11 Yaroslava

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    Yes, cool animals! I remember at the "Livakvariya" they sold beefy ones))) You can hit the road and get lucky in shorts (well, or something else). )))

    Maybe someday they will learn how to breed them successfully. Judging by the video posted by Polina, there are only three babies left from the entire clutch, maybe even from two different clutches, since they are of different sizes (ages?). I also saw one video with a fry, but there was only one fry, even smaller than these.

    # 12 Polina Rodionova

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    To keep this fish, you need a forest of acroporas and a volume of several tons, it would be better if it was generally forbidden to catch these fish, like beautiful nudibranchs.

    In general, they feed it like this, they take the branches of the acropora, freeze it and wrap it with a thread, and gradually throw it in, but it is worth staying only in the quarantine jar, in the display it is unrealistic to attract his attention with this.

    It is not necessary to spread the acropores on the branches.

    It is enough to make the fish understand that what they are offered is food.

    It's just that many fish cannot get to this on their own and they need help.

    Then the smell will be familiar to them.

    Be a man hungry

    Would it have occurred to him that a road bumper, for example, was edible?

    And I would not try ..

    Of my two oxymons, one is already actively taking food (both floating and attached, in the display, by the way),

    I bought the second out of pity, there was immediately a feeling that 99% would not survive, since some bones, muscles are not.

    But so far he is swimming.

    • sobolyavka likes this

    # 13 Sasha27

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    • My name is Alexander
    • Location: Smolensk

    It is not necessary to spread the acropores on the branches.

    It is enough to make the fish understand that what they are offered is food.

    It's just that many fish cannot get to this on their own and they need help.

    Then the smell will be familiar to them.

    Be a man hungry

    Would it have occurred to him that a road bumper, for example, was edible?

    And I would not try ..

    Of my two oxymons, one is already actively taking food (both floating and attached, in the display, by the way),

    I bought the second out of pity, there was immediately a feeling that 99% would not survive, since some bones, muscles are not.

    But for now, he swims.

    Two days ago, I also became the owner of a very thin oxymonocant, I smear the skeletons of acroporas with mussels, sprayed various frozen food near it, but all to no avail, only once yesterday I tasted the mussel and immediately spat it out. Today he sleeps all day on the branch of the acropora, resting his horn on it, apparently his strength is completely leaving him, it is very pity to look at him. Please share your experience, how to draw his attention to food?

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