Bird Families

Rape flower beetle

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Only hurts the wrestler.

Damages leaves at the ends of stems and buds.

Distributed in the south of the country.

  • regular spraying with 0.15-0.2% nicotine sulfate or anabazine sulfate with the addition of 0.4% soap, 4% soap solution,
  • dusting with 5% nikodust or anabadust.

Meligethes aeneus

Rape sequin, Meligethes brassicae

Coleoptera (Beetles) - Coleoptera

Rapeseed beetle - a pest of cultivated and wild cruciferous plants. It is observed on some fruit, umbellate, Compositae and species of other families. Development is complete. Reproduction is bisexual. Beetles hibernate in the soil. One generation develops a year.

Click on the photo to enlarge

Morphology

Imago... The beetle is 1.5–2.7 mm long. Claws without teeth. The platband is cut straight ahead. The top is metallic green, blue, bronze or purple. Covered with very dense punctures, the intervals between which are smaller than the punctures themselves. Antennae and legs are dark, sometimes the forelegs are reddish-brown.

Sexual dimorphism... Different-sex individuals differ in the structure of the genitals.

Egg at the beginning of development, it is transparent, with time it becomes milky white. The egg shape is elongated oval. Length - 0.7 mm.

Larva light gray with small black warts. The head is brown, with three pairs of legs.

Chrysalis yellow-white. Length - 2 mm.

Phenology of development (in days)

Development

Imago winters. In early spring, it flies out of the soil and populates the first flowers of wild and cultivated plants (coltsfoot, buttercup, rape, dandelion). During the period of bud formation, the flower beetle migrates to cultivated cruciferous plants and feeds on the inner parts of the buds and flowers, eating stamens, pistils, petals and pollen.

Mating period... At the end of the period of additional feeding, heterosexual individuals mate, and the females lay eggs inside the still unblown buds - 1–4 in each bud.

Egg... The embryo develops in 4-12 days.

Larva at first it feeds on pollen, as it develops, it gnaws at the petals of the corolla. It develops in 20-30 days.

Chrysalis... The adult larva pupates in the soil, in a special cradle.

Imago... The duration of development is 40-50 days. Hatching of young beetles is observed in late June-early July. Newborn individuals feed on flowers of various plants and, as the temperature drops, hibernate in the soil at the edges of the fields.

Morphologically related species

The morphology (appearance) of the imago is close to the described species Greenish Blestyanka (Meligethes viridescens). It has a reddish-yellow color of the legs, the points at the top are more rare, the intervals between them are larger than the points themselves.

In addition to this species, Meligethes hebes is often found, which is also similar in morphology of adults to the rape flower beetle (Meligethes aeneus).

Geographic distribution

The rape blossom beetle is widespread throughout the European part of Russia, as well as in the Caucasus, Siberia, Central Asia, Western Europe, North Africa, Western Asia and North America.

Harmfulness

Rape flower beetle is a dangerous pest of vegetable crops. Adults and larvae are harmful. In the adult stage, it damages the anthers and other parts of the flowers of rapeseed, cabbage, radish, mustard and other wild and cultivated crucifers. May damage flowers of apple, cherry, sugar beet, poppy, buttercup, umbrella, asteraceae and others. The larvae develop in cruciferous buds and seriously harm, reducing seed yield.

Economic threshold of harmfulness determined at the germination stage and established when there are 6–8 beetles per plant.

Agrotechnical methods

  • Early planting of seed plants in compliance with the basic rules, contributing to their friendly and fast flowering.
  • Loosening of the soil during the pupation of the pest.
  • Weed control.
  • Fertilization.

Mechanical method

With low infestation in small areas, beetles are harvested by hand with further destruction. The collection is recommended in the morning.

Euonymus aphid (Latin Aphis evonymi F.).

In addition to amaranthus, it harms euonymus, viburnum, jasmine and various herbaceous plants.

Aphids damage leaves and stem tops, causing curling and abnormal development.

  • two to three times spraying with 0.15-0.2% nicotine sulfate or anabazine sulfate with 0.4% soap, 4% soap solution,
  • dusting with 5% nikodust or anabadust.

Bean aphid (Latin Aphis fabae Scop.).

Harmful to dahlia, poppy, rhubarb, euonymus and other plants.

Damages leaves and stems by sucking juice out of them.

The methods of struggle are the same as with the euonymus aphid.

Pea aphid (Latin Acyrthosiphon pisi Kalt.).

Damages leaves and stems of leguminous plants.

  • single or double spraying with 0.15-0.2% nicotine or anabazine-sulfate with the addition of 0.4% soap, 4% soap solution,
  • dusting with 5% nikodust or anabadust.

Dioecious helichris aphid (Latin Anuraphis helichrisi Kalt.).

Harmful to plants of the Rosaceae family, Compositae plants and forget-me-nots.

Aphids damage flowers.

  • regular spraying with 0.15-0.2% nicotine sulfate or anabazine sulfate with the addition of 0.4% soap, 4% soap solution,
  • dusting with 5% nikodust or anabadust.

Cabbage aphid (lat.Brevicoryne brassicae L.).

Harmful to various cruciferous plants.

Sucking causes whitish or pinkish and ugly leaves, damages flower stems.

Widespread species.

  • spraying with 0.15-0.2% nicotine sulfate or anabazine sulfate with the addition of 0.4% soap, 4% soap solution,
  • dusting 5% with nikodust or anabadust,
  • elimination of cruciferous weeds and testis residues.

Mallow aphid (Latin Aphis malvae Koch.).

Harmful to the marshmallow and the stem — to the rose.

Aphids damage the leaves on the underside, causing them to curl.

  • spraying with 0.15-0.2% nicotine sulfate or anabazine sulfate with the addition of 0.4% soap, 4% soap solution,
  • dusting with 5% nikodust or anabadust.

Greenhouse aphid (lat.Myzodes persicae Sulz.).

Harmful to lacfiola, hydrangea, geranium, hibiscus, fuchsia, cyclamen, primrose, calceolaria, saltwort, tobacco, sweet peas, dahlia, cineraria and other plants.

It feeds on the underside of leaves, as well as on shoots, buds and pedicels, causing whitishness, curling and deformation of leaves and a delay in flowering. The damaged organs often do not open.

It is ubiquitous in greenhouses, especially harmful to industrial flowering plants.

  • regular spraying with 0.15-0.2% nicotine sulfate or anabazine sulfate, 4% soap solution,
  • dusting 5% with nikodust or anabadust,
  • fumigation with tobacco smoke or vapors of nicotine, anabasine, naphthalene.

Pelargonium aphid (lat.Aulacorthum pelargonii Kalt.).

Harmful to geraniums, fuchsia, calceolaria and other plants.

Damages the leaves on the underside, buds and pedicels, causing whitishness on the leaves and a delay in flowering.

It is ubiquitous in greenhouses, especially harmful to industrial flowering plants.

The methods of struggle are the same as with the greenhouse aphid.

Rose aphid (Latin Macrosiphum rosae L.).

Harmful to roses in the open field and in greenhouses.

Aphids damage leaves and shoot tips.

Widespread species.

  • spraying with 0.15-0.2% nicotine sulfate or anabazine sulfate with the addition of 0.4% soap, 4% soap solution,
  • dusting with 5% nikodust or anabadust.

Hop aphid (Latin Phorodon humuli Schn.).

Harmful to thorns, plums, hops.

Aphids inhabit the ends of stems and leaves, sucking out their juices.

  • spraying with 0.15-0.2% nicotine sulfate or anabazine sulfate with the addition of 0.4% soap, 4% soap solution,
  • dusting with 5% nikodust or anabadust.

Malvian fathead (lat.Carcharodus alceae Esp.).

Harmful to marshmallow medicinal, stock - rose and rope.

The caterpillars cut the leaf, wrapping its edge on the upper side and braiding it with a cobweb.

The species is distributed in the south of the European part, in the Crimea, the Caucasus, Altai and Central Asia.

Control methods - insecticide dusting.

Hop thinworm (Latin Hepialis humuli L.).

Harmful to hops, various lily, haze, asteraceae, nightshade and other plants.

Caterpillars eat the roots inside and out.

Widespread species.

Ways to fight - scattering poisoned potato baits.

Onion rattle (lat.Lilioceris merdigera L.).

Harmful to lily plants.

Beetles gnaw round or oblong holes in the leaves from the sides or from the top. The larvae skeletonize leaves.

Distributed in the European part of the country.

Methods of control - pollination of plants with insecticides.

Asparagus rattle (lat.Crioceris asparagi L.).

Beetles and larvae gnaw stems and leaves.

Distributed in the southern zone of the country.

  • spraying with 0.2-0.3% nicotine sulfate or anabazine sulfate with 4% soap,
  • dusting with 5% anabadust or nikodust.

Gladiolus thrips (lat.Taeniothrips simplex Moris.).

Harmful to gladiolus, freesia, amaryllis, knifofia, iris, budlet, calendula, daffodil.

Thrips suck the bottom of the bulb, causing the scales to die off.

  • careful inspection of the bulbs,
  • destruction of heavily infested bulbs,
  • disinfection of bulbs by immersion in hot water (50 ° C) for 5 minutes.

Pea thrips (lat.Kakothrips robustus Uzel.).

Harmful to plants from the legume family and buttercup.

Adult thrips damage leaves, stems, flowers, larvae - flowers and pods.

From the sucking of thrips, brownish spots appear on the leaves, the stems become attached, the flowers are underdeveloped, and whitish spots appear on them.

The species is common in the European part and in the Caucasus.

  • digging or plowing the soil in autumn,
  • spraying with 0.15-0.2% nicotine sulfate or anabazine sulfate with the addition of 0.4% soap,
  • dusting with 5% nikodust or anabadust.

Greenhouse thrips (Latin Heliothrips haemorrhoidalis Bouche).

In addition to azalea, it harms ferns, araucaria, palms, dwarf, aspidistra, dracaena, crinum, ficus, laurel, rose, citrus fruits, cissus, hibiscus, camellia, begonias, cacti, eugenia, myrtle, rhododendron, cyclamen, primrose, and other greenhouse plants, and in the open field - grapes, fruit crops and in greenhouses cucumbers and pumpkin plants.

Adult insects and larvae settle on the underside of the leaves, where they feed. In places of feeding, rusty-brown spots are formed, the surface of the leaves is covered with numerous excrements that look like small black specks. Whitish, small specks appear on the upper side of the leaves.

Severely damaged leaves turn yellow, dry out and fall off.

Distributed on the Black Sea coast of the Caucasus and everywhere in greenhouses, greenhouses, sometimes found in indoor growing conditions.

  • 2-3 times spraying with 0.2-0.3% nicotine-sulfate or anabazine-sulfate with the addition of soap in the amount of 0.4%,
  • dusting with 5% nikodust or anabadust.

Greenhouse thrips (lat.Parthenothrips dracaenae Heeg.).

Harmful to krinum, ficus, cissus, begonias, gloxinia and other greenhouse plants, especially palms and dracaena.

Adult greenhouse thrips and larvae suck on the underside of the leaves, causing rusty brown spots and whiteness on the upper side. Excrement is left on the leaves in the form of small black droplets.

Distributed in greenhouses.

The methods of struggle are the same as with greenhouse thrips.

Tobacco thrips (Latin Thrips tabaci Lind.).

Harmful to asparagus, soybeans, geraniums, cotton, dope, belladonna, tobacco, as well as onions and other plants.

Larvae and adult thrips damage the leaves, causing them to turn yellow and fall off.

Adult tobacco thrips and larvae damage the leaves on the underside, causing yellowish brown spots.

  • two-three spraying with 0.2-0.3% nicotine or anabazine-sulfate with the addition of 0.4% soap,
  • dusting of 8-10% with nikodust or anabadust.

Common earwig (Latin Forficula auricularia L.).

Harmful to carnation, poppy, rose, phlox, lobelia, ageratum, dahlia, as well as vegetables, legumes and fruit crops.

Adults and larvae eat the leaves and petals of flowers.

Earwigs are nocturnal, during the day they hide in nests or in various secluded places and crawl out to the surface of the soil with the onset of darkness, when they damage the plants. Adults and larvae gnaw round or irregularly shaped holes on the leaves, and also eat the petals of flowers. In addition, earwigs can completely eat seedlings and young plantings of flowering plants. In dahlia flowers, earwigs often climb inside the flowers, exposing the back of the abdomen outward.

The species is found everywhere, except for the Far North.

  • cleaning areas from various debris that can serve as a shelter for earwigs for a day, the collected garbage should be raked into heaps and burned,
  • lay out bait boards or heaps of grass, burdock leaves and small stones near the plants in order to attract earwigs for a day, during the day these baits are looked through and the earwigs are destroyed,
  • pollination of plants with insecticides.

Garden earwig (Latin Forficula tomis Kal.).

Harms asters and other floral, ornamental, as well as garden and vegetable plants.

Adults and larvae eat the leaves and petals of flowers.

The methods of struggle are the same as with an ordinary earwig.

Forbia (lat.Phorbia sp.).

Fly larvae harm the delphinium.

The larva damages the roots and makes moves in the stems.

Damaged plants become infected with rot. Damaged stunted stems do not produce flowers.

  • cleaning rhizomes when transplanting them to new places,
  • planting plants in pits sprayed with insecticides.

Garden beetle (lat.Phyllopertha horticola L.).

Harmful to rose, apple, plum, lilac and other deciduous trees.

Beetles eat buds, leaves and flowers. The larvae feed on the roots of herbaceous plants, sometimes harm seedlings and young pines in nurseries.

Distributed everywhere, except for the steppes and the Far North.

  • shaking off beetles on tarps in the early morning hours and collecting beetles in buckets of kerosene,
  • dusting trees while feeding beetles with sodium fluorosilicate,
  • insecticide dusting of plant roots when planting them in areas inhabited by grub larvae,
  • plowing of wastelands and glades inhabited by larvae and keeping them under black steam until the larvae completely disappear,
  • leaving unplowed areas in order to attract female beetles for laying eggs; in these areas, paradichlorobenzene or polychlorides should be introduced into the soil,
  • loosening the soil with sampling of larvae.

Rose leafhopper (lat.Typhlocyba rosae L.).

Harmful to rose, wild rose, apple and other rosaceae.

Adults and larvae suck the leaves from the lower surface, forming whitish small specks in the form of dots on top.

Widespread species.

  • spraying with 0.3% nicotine sulfate or anabazine sulfate with the addition of 0.4% soap,
  • dusting of 7% with nikodust or anabadust.

Citrus mealybug (Latin Pseudococcus gahani Green).

In addition to azalea, it harms pittosporum, geranium, acacia, citrus, boxwood, ilex, grapes, camellia, tea bush, eugenia, myrtle, callistemon, fuchsia, aralia, griselinia, rhododendron, oleander, coleus, viburnum and other plants.

Adult females and larvae damage leaves, petioles, buds, pedicels, branches and trunks.

As a result of damage, the plants are delayed in development and are covered with white spiderweb secretions from insects. On the honeydew isolated by the females, soot fungi develop, polluting the plants.

  • regular destruction of worms and their eggs,
  • the use of cryptolemus (biological method),
  • fumigation of plants.

Grape mealybug (lat.Pseudococcus citri Risso).

Harmful to ferns, palms, bromeliads, amaryllis, citrus fruits, grapes, jasmine, osmanthus, coleus, justice, gardenia, coffee tree, perilla and other greenhouse, fruit, ornamental, technical plants, and can also live on potatoes.

Females and larvae damage the leaves, more often at their base and under the scales of the bulbs, as well as the buds and pedicels, the affected parts of the plant die off. A sooty fungus ("black") develops on heavily damaged parts of the plant.

The methods of struggle are the same as with citrus mealybugs.

Bristly mealybug (lat.Pseudococcus adonidum Geoffr.).

Mealybug harm is noted on pandanus, palms, aroids, dwarf, dracaena, clivia, bananas, magnolia, geranium, begonia, calistemone, fuchsia, oleander, coleus, especially cycads and other predominantly greenhouse tropical plants.

The adult female and larvae damage leaves and stems.

It is widely distributed in greenhouses, and also occurs on indoor plants.

The methods of struggle are the same as with citrus mealybugs.

Palmbug (lat.Nipaecoccus nipae Mask.).

The harm from the palm bug has been recorded on palms, aroid, banana, and orchids.

Adult females and larvae feed on leaves, causing yellow spots to form.

Distributed in greenhouses.

Ways of struggle - spraying with 0.9% kerosene-soap emulsion.

Seaside mealybug (lat.Pseudococcus maritimus Ehrh.).

Larvae and females damage all types of cacti.

Distributed on the Black Sea coast of the Caucasus, on the southern coast of Crimea and in greenhouses.

The methods of struggle are the same as with citrus mealybugs.

Cactus mealybug (Latin Pseudococcus mammillaria Bouche).

Harms only cactus.

Larvae and females feed on the root parts of the stems and cladodia.

Ways of struggle - regular cleaning of plants with brushes and washing with nicotine or anabasine-soap solution.

Greenhouse lamellar bug (Latin Orthezia insignis Doubl.).

Harmful to many greenhouse plants.

Larvae and females harm leaves and stems, causing yellowing and dropping of leaves.

With the mass reproduction of the worm, the plants are delayed in development and the leaves fall off.

Distributed in greenhouses.

Ways of struggle - spraying with 1% kerosene-soap emulsion.

Nutcrackers (lat.Agriotes lineatus L).

They harm lilies, poppy seeds, rhubarb, rose, castor oil plants, hops, dahlias, strawberries and various technical, vegetable, field and other plants; they often harm fruit and ornamental plants in nurseries.

They harm plants in open ground, in greenhouses, and can also harm potted crops.

The larvae gnaw the stems, eat and eat the tubers. Damaged stems wilt.

Of the family of clickers, the most harmful are striped, dark, sowing, steppe, wide, shiny and black clickers.

Crackers are widespread everywhere, especially in large quantities found in the forest and forest-steppe zones, where the greatest harm from them is observed.

  • deep winter plowing and cultivation of plants and fallow areas intended for planting reduces the number of wireworms,
  • pupae, which die from mechanical damage, are especially sensitive to soil cultivation,
  • thorough sifting and viewing of the soil when filling greenhouses and when planting plants in pots,
  • weed control, especially wheatgrass,
  • liming of acidic soils worsens the conditions for the development of larvae,
  • the introduction of ammonia fertilizers for the fastest development of plants also has a detrimental effect on the larvae,
  • dusting with insecticides.

Bromeliad shield (lat.Diaspis bromeliae Kern.).

Harmful to palms, bromeliads, fragrant olives and other plants.

Larvae and females by sucking cause the formation of yellow spots on the leaves and stems.

Control methods - spraying with 1.8% mineral oil emulsion.

Aspidistric scale (Latin Pinnaspis aspidistrae Sign.).

In addition to aspidistra, it harms cycads and ferns.

Larvae and females damage leaves and stems.

The methods of struggle are the same as with the bromeliad shield.

Scale cactus (Latin Diaspis echinocacti Bouche).

Harm only to cactus. Opuntia is especially harmful.

Larvae and females damage the cladodes of cacti, disfiguring and causing them to dry out.

Ways of struggle - regular washing of plants with nicotine or anabasine-soap solution.

Brown scale insect (lat.Chrysomphalus dictyospermi Morg.).

Harmful to cinnamomum, magnolia, lemon, myrtle and other plants.

Larvae and females suck leaves mainly from the upper side, less often shoots, branches, fruits.

Yellow spots form on the leaves, the stems, shoots and branches dry out, the leaves fall off.

  • spraying with 1% mineral oil emulsion,
  • regular cleaning of plants followed by washing with nicotine or anabasine-soap solution,
  • fumigation of infected plants.

Ivy scale (lat.Aspidiotus hederae Vail.).

Damaged plants include asparagus, magnolia, aucuba, buxus, holly, euonymus, ivy, oleander and other greenhouse and subtropical plants.

Larvae and females cause harm. Scale insects damage only stems on asparagus, and leaves, petioles, stems and shoots on other plants; light greenish or yellowish spots are formed in places where the scale insects feed.

With a massive attack of the scale insect, as a result of its nutrition, the shoots are deformed and the leaves fall.

The species is widespread in the western Caucasus, the southern coast of Crimea, and everywhere in greenhouses.

  • spraying with 1% mineral oil emulsion against larvae,
  • it is recommended to regularly clean the plants with a soft brush, followed by washing them with nicotine or anabasine-soap solution.

Laurel scale (lat.Aonidia lauri Bouche).

Harms only the noble laurel.

Larvae and females damage leaves, twigs and trunk, causing leaves to fall off and twigs to dry out.

  • regular cleaning of plants with a brush is recommended, followed by washing with nicotine or anabasine-soap solution,
  • spraying with 1% mineral oil emulsion.

Palm scale (Latin Diaspis boisduvalii Sign.).

Harmful to palm trees, especially fan palms, and bananas.

Larvae and females damage leaves and petioles, causing the leaves to turn yellow. Scabbards mainly damage young, unfolding leaves of fan palms.

With severe damage, the development of leaves is suspended.

Ways of struggle - regular cleaning of the plant with a soft brush, followed by washing with nicotine or anabazine-soap solution.

Patching shield (Latin Hemiberlesia lataniae Sign.).

Harmful only to palm trees.

Larvae and females damage leaves and stems, causing yellowish spots.

The methods of struggle are the same as with the palm shield.

Black scale insect (lat.Parlatoria zizyphi Lucas).

Adult females and larvae damage leaves, twigs, trunks and fruits.

Ways of struggle - spraying with 2% mineral oil emulsion.

Repellent flowers

The number of plant helpers in our daily pest control is truly enormous. Among them there are many truly beautiful flowers that are not ashamed to be planted in a flower bed. Here's a list:

  • Marigolds (tagetes),
  • Decorative tansy,
  • Geranium,
  • Delphinium,
  • Petunia,
  • Dalmatian chamomile, feverfew,
  • Nasturtium,
  • Calendula,
  • Lavender.

An adorable and enjoyable list, isn't it? Let's see which of the garden pests is not happy with these bright flowers.

Marigolds (tagetes) against pests

A very popular plant among gardeners - it blooms for a long time and does not require special care.

Meanwhile, the flowers of marigolds secrete phytoncides that scare away nematodes and other small soil worms from potatoes and tomatoes.

Marigolds planted around the perimeter of the strawberry beds will reliably protect the berry from the weevil.

Place a flower bed with marigolds next to the plantings of onions and cabbage - your vegetables will no longer suffer from invasions of onion flies, scoops and cabbage whites.

The infusion of marigolds is used against aphids on legumes and fruit trees and bushes. To prepare the infusion, the stems and flowers are crushed and filled in half of the bucket. Then the bucket is poured to the top with warm water (40-60 ° C) and insisted for two days. After that, 40 grams of liquid soap is added to the strained infusion and the affected plants are sprayed. In addition, the infusion of marigolds can disinfect the bulbs of gladioli.

In the fall, cut off the stems and withered flowers of marigolds and bury them in the beds for the winter. So you will heal the soil in your area, prevent the development of pathogenic fungi, for example, those that cause fusarium.

Tansy against pests

This perennial plant is considered a weed and is usually removed from vegetable gardens. But there are also decorative varieties of tansy, which can become not only a flower bed decoration, but also protectors from harmful insects. For the essential oils of this plant contain thujone, camphor and alcoids, which are toxic to some types of pests.

The pungent smell of tansy is not to the liking of the Colorado beetle, honeydew, cabbage whitewash, onion fly, weevil and ticks.

You can use powder from dry tansy inflorescences in the fight against moths on gooseberries and currants.

Ants do not favor tansy, so it is recommended to plant this flower on all sides of the site.

To protect the apple trees from the moth, tansy is planted in the tree trunks.

Calendula (marigold) against pests

The flower-marigold with yellow or orange petals, known to everyone from childhood, has been helping gardeners in the difficult fight against pests for several centuries.

Calendula is often planted interspersed with potatoes to protect crops from the Colorado potato beetle.

If calendula is sown between the beds with cabbage, peppers, tomatoes, then it will protect the crop from ticks and nematodes.

Calendula growing next to strawberries will save the latter from aphids, taking "fire on itself." If you see that the calendula stems are literally covered with aphids, do not panic - the aphids will remain on the nails, and the strawberry bushes will not suffer.

Calendula phytoncides suppress the asparagus rattle, hawk caterpillars and many species of aphids.

The proximity of calendula with asters prevents the development of black legs in the latter.

This plant, like marigolds, prevents the spread of fungal diseases, heals the earth and is an excellent green manure. Cover the stems and leaves of calendula in the soil, put it in compost, use it when making warm ridges and furrows for planting potatoes.

Feverfew (Dalmatian, Caucasian, Persian chamomile) against pests

This plant is a real gift from nature for the gardener, as it is a natural insecticide. The pyrethrins and cinerins contained in the flowers of pyrethrum penetrate the skin of insects and paralyze them. At the same time, these substances are absolutely harmless for pets and humans.

Caucasian chamomile kills ants, flies, cockroaches, fleas, lice, aphids, mosquitoes, mosquitoes, spiders and ticks. It can be used as a repellent, "fumigating" rooms.

Plant feverfew next to cabbage and you will forget about caterpillars and aphids.

Growing next to apple trees and other fruit trees, feverfew will reliably protect your garden from moths, aphids and other pests.

If you plant feverfew chamomile next to phloxes, the latter will not be affected by the nematode.

Another good news is that mice and rats are not crazy about this amazing chamomile. You can breed it in the favorite habitats of rodents, thereby scaring them away.

From the dried flowers of pyrethrum, an effective powder is made against fleas, larvae, suckers and caterpillars, which are pollinated by young plants in spring.

Feverfew can be sprayed on pets to prevent fleas and ticks.

Nasturtium against pests

Bright, adorable nasturtium is also ready to help a pest fighter.

A few nasturtiums on a cabbage patch will scare off the white-headed woman. A bed of nasturtiums near the greenhouse entrance will not give the whitefly a chance to damage your tomatoes.

Nasturtium is a welcome neighbor for peonies, as it prevents the development of fungal diseases of these flowers.

Plant nasturtium under cherries and apricots. It will not only serve as a protector against pests, but will also become an excellent green fertilizer if you dig it in in the fall right in the trunk circles.

The stalks and leaves of nasturtium are the ideal filler for potato trenches, because they rid the soil of the fungus that causes potato late blight.

Geranium against pests

Geranium - a regular on our windowsills and balconies - as it turned out, is quite capable of protecting our house and garden from unnecessary insects.

This flower disinfects the room, therefore, as a houseplant, it is simply irreplaceable.

The acrid smell of geranium is not tolerated by many pests of fruit and berry crops, so it is worth planting geranium (or placing pots with it) between the bushes in the berry fields. Thus, you can protect the berry bushes from aphids.

Geranium repels flies well, so a few pots with this wonderful flower will not be superfluous in the terrace in front of the house.

Petunia against pests

Florists are very fond of multi-colored petunia, but some insects prefer to stay away from it

Petunias resist almost all pests and diseases of legumes.

Plus, this gorgeous flower will help save your radishes, turnips, daikon and Chinese cabbage from the cruciferous flea hordes.

And the neighborhood with petunia protects asters from fusarium.

Lavender against pests

The scent of lavender is gentle and pleasant, but not everyone is able to enjoy it.

For example, the moth does not tolerate lavender, and this is only to our advantage. Dry stems and lavender flowers in the closet will protect woolen and fur items from this gluttonous pest.

Ants, aphids and slugs are also not fans of lavender, which means we have another good reason to decorate our flower beds and flower beds with this flower.

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